Supporting high school and college students to ensure they get to and through college

Our Mission

We distinctively teach, mentor, and support academically ambitious low-income Hispanic high-school and college students in under-resourced Michigan Hispanic communities, and work to eliminate equity barriers that stall academic and employment opportunities.

The Michigan Hispanic Collaborative leverages the academic readiness and college access work created by our partners and makes it accessible and culturally relevant to our students.

Vision

Our Vision

To accelerate Hispanic economic mobility and reduce the growing poverty in the Detroit Hispanic community and poverty throughout Michigan’s Hispanic communities. We believe the most permanent and rapid way to economically stabilize the Hispanic community is through a bachelor’s degree. Our Hispanic “familismo” culture of strong extended and connected families ensures that when you educate one Latino, you empower a community.
Leaders

MiHC leadership

Hispanic leaders work together to foster business, community, and education collaborations
Anita I. Martínez

Executive Director

Lawrence T. García

President and Chair

JoAnn Chávez

Founder and Secretary

Alma Crossley

Board Member

2+

Schools (and growing!)

678

Students served

1124

Volunteer Hours

23

Partners

Approach

Our Approach

MiHC provides intentional support and guidance for high school and college students to ensure their college access and persistence. Through our culturally relevant, in-school, 2-generation program, we help students navigate the complex system of college access.
1

11th & 12th Grade Support

  • FAFSA/Financial Aid, essay-writing,
    and scholarship workshops
  • Academic enrichment through
    tutoring and SAT support
  • Internship experiences and a career boot camp, which includes hard and soft skills training
  • Mentorship and exposure opportunities
  • A summer Latinx Send-Off for college-bound students to aid students in creating cohorts,
    connecting them to university resources, and mentors
  • College tours and experiences
  • Access to a trained college counselor
2

College-level Support

  • Corporate internships
  • Creation of cohorts at Midwest universities
  • Mentorship and exposure
  • Additional soft skills training
  • Networking and leadership
    development events
  • Career development
3

Early Career Support

  • Professional and leadership development
  • Career Planning
  • First-look career fairs
  • Industry-specific mentorship
4

Collaboration & Research​

  • Michigan High School Principal and Counselor summit for Hispanic-serving schools
  • Michigan college admissions and
    financial aid summit
  • Partnerships and events with Michigan College Access and Detroit College Access Networks
  • Partnerships and events with all Hispanic professional associations
  • Collaboration with other first-generation college support organizations
  • SW Detroit Community partners and parents to cultivate the college-going culture
5

Community-Focused​

By empowering academically ambitious students from underrepresented communities  to complete college, MiHC  positions students to financially thrive, mentor, and volunteer to help stabilize Michigan communities

Sponsors

Our Sponsors

The work of the Michigan Hispanic Collaborative would not be possible without the support of our sponsors. We would also like to thank the private donors and family foundations who have contributed to the launch of Próx Gen so far.
Success

Our Stories

“The Próx Gen program demonstrates the increasing sophistication and conscientiousness of area Hispanics. We are getting better at addressing larger problems and at accessing the American middle class.”

Lawrence T. Garcia

President, MiHC

Need

The need

Hispanics represent over 18% of the United States population and are projected to make up a third of the population by 2050. Despite these powerful numbers, the Hispanic community remains undereducated, underemployed, and underrepresented.

Low college attainment has a negative impact on a state’s economy. The Hispanic academic achievement gap alone is currently costing Michigan $1 billion.

There are 500,000 Hispanics in Michigan. 25% of them are living below the poverty level.

Of Hispanics in poverty in Detroit, 51% are under the age of 17

15.7% of Hispanics in Michigan are getting bachelor’s degrees – in Detroit, the rate is 6.1%

The Hispanic community is almost 17% behind the national average of individuals with a bachelor’s degree, the annual wage advantage for individuals with bachelor’s degrees is around $24k

The median household income for Hispanics in Southwest Detroit is $27,811 – compared to the median household income in the U.S. ($57,652)

News

MiHC News

Check out Michigan Hispanic Collaborative in the news! 

Reach

Get in Touch

Connect with Us

(313) 617-2266

About us

Learn more about MiHC!

Where to find us

1420 Washington Blvd, Suite 301, Detroit, MI 48226

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